Nomadic Gains

Sorry, sorry, sorry!

Yes, I know it’s been a few weeks since the Huel Review post. I have no excuse and seek your forgiveness. Do I have it? Cool, thanks! You guys and girls are great.

So, I’ve been away for the last few weeks. My travels and holidays haven’t stopped me working out though, and I’ve seen gains on the way.

Before I get in to the travels….a new Clean & Jerk Personal Record! After the 103.5kg a short while ago, I then nailed 105kg…followed with 107.5kg in the garage gym, on a Sunday! @amrapplusone programming really pulling me up this hill. Love it!

First up, Tampa, Florida. Yeah, boy!

Florida in July. All with work but after a 9hr flight, I was invited to throwdown in CrossFit TAS by a long-time buddy of mine. Yep, within 90 mins of landing, this was us:

CrossFit TAS are regular Regionals Team competitors and yeah, it shows. What a box. Newbies and elite athletes throwing down together to the same programming each day. Immense attitude and genuinely friendliness too, top bunch. It was awesome to catch up with Roly. He got me in to CrossFit in early 2012 although he has really progressed onward and upward. Great to see.

Next up, back to the garage gym and another Personal Record, this time in the Snatch.

Using my 10.5kg York Beefy Bar, and a random collection of old plates, I secured a 77.5kg Snatch. That’s 2.5kg higher than a number that I’ve held for over 2 years, unchanged.

Staying in the garage gym at home, I also recorded this little number: https://youtu.be/kRCmAJJirJQ

Do check it out.

In between all of that, I’ve been getting workouts in regularly, not letting the excuse for a British Summer put me off with its regular downpours and cold snaps. We’ve also been out and about in Cornwall and North Devon. While I have no photos, I did this on the beach in Combe Martin:

I ran the mile down to the beach in an ok 7:30, did the WOD with a piece of wall, bricks and cement (all unbroken) and then staggered back the second mile.

So, it’s been a good couple of weeks away. Back now, and back in C.F. Watford for the next few weeks, I’m looking for some more pre-summer holiday gains and improvements.

Watch this space!

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Greatness comes from Joy…and a truck load of Hard Graft.

If you can’t find Joy in the path you are on and what you are working toward now,

how do you expect to find Joy when you get there?

I experienced 2 great lessons this weekend. Ones that we all ‘know’, that we’re all told over and over yet few truly believe or adhere to.

While at Wookey Hole Caves on Saturday, I was aggressively reminded that Greatness takes time. In our modern, consumerist, “now” society I think that many of us (certainly, not all) have collectively forgotten just what is required for true success to be achieved. There is a sense of entitlement pervading society; there is the belief that we somehow deserve success without having to put the true effort in to achieve it – we look at the cover models of Mens Health, or at Olympians, or CrossFit Games athletes and think, “I should be be there”. Yet, when you look around a cave formed over 10s of 1000s of years, and wonder at the splendid magnificence of it, you see that genuine greatness really does take time. When it was explained to us how the larger, 73 foot high caverns were formed, some beginning with nothing more than dripping water, you can’t help but make a comparison with modern life. I have my goals and I regularly get upset and frustrated that I have yet to achieve them. I often decry the length of time this process takes, missing the small gains along the way, focusing on the distance yet to travel. And I get upset because I feel that I deserve to be there by now. I put the effort in, I believe, and I am entitled to see the success NOW.

But life isn’t like that. Success takes time. Not only that, the successes along the way need celebrating too. I have no idea just how big that cavern is going to be in another 100, 1000, 10000 years but it’s pretty goddamn amazing now. I don’t know how strong, fast, flexible, powerful I will be next year, in 5 years, or in 10 years time, but I have put a lot of effort in and I am in a pretty outstanding place now. As long as I keep chipping away at it, one drop at a time, the only way is success.

The other lesson – Joy enables that Greatness. We were treated to a circus display from the Wookey Hole Circus School. These children and teenagers train 3 times per week and the ages seem to range from about 7 years to 17 years old. They showed off juggling, trapeze skills, strength, rope work, incredible balance & acrobatics, high unicycles, etc….it was clearly a physically and mentally tough performance for them all. There were some minor errors in the latter, and more complicated, stages but there was one thing that stood out throughout, especially during the minor mistakes – the sheer joy on the faces of those taking part. It  was amazing and incredibly uplifting. They were laughing at each other, constantly smiling, helping each other, and willing each other on through every moment. It looked like the world’s most fun ever and they were right in the centre of it. Sure, they had to demonstrate intense concentration to achieve some remarkable feats but never once did it look like pressure. At all times, it just looked like they were messing about with friends.

This is such a key lesson in life. When we look back, do we want to focus on the minor mistakes, the what-ifs, the could-have-beens, the oh-so-closes…..or do we want to look back on those moments of sheer joy and success with friends and family? Those fun-filled events where you achieved so much with a grin on your face, no matter what the adversity in front of you. I took a lot from this, especially as a parent to the Warrior Princesses.

Funnily enough, as I was thinking about this post, Andy Murray (tennis player bloke off the tele) was talking about this year’s Wimbledon prep. He said that in previous years he focused on the process, the preparation for winning-at-all-costs, that he didn’t really enjoy the success when it came. This year, he’s just enjoying his tennis, taking it how it comes and celebrating each little victory with a smile – a perfect case in point. Here’s to you and a third Wimbledon title, Mr Murray!

Strength

5-3-1 Strict Press

62.5kg / 70kg / 80kg / 85kg (F) / 82.5kg PERSONAL BEST!

So, 38 years old and still getting strength personal bests! Smash! It’s a 2.5kg PB over a lift 2 years ago. If I’d had a bit more time, I suspect I would have got the 85kg on another attempt too. BIG SMILES!

MetCon

For Time:

  • 50 x Double Unders
  • 10 x Clean & Jerk (Power) @ 50kg
  • 40 x Double Unders
  • 8 x Clean & Jerk @ 60kg
  • 30 x Double Unders
  • 6 x Clean & Jerk @ 65kg
  • 20 x Double Unders
  • 4 x Clean & Jerks @ 70kg
  • 10 x Double Unders

Time: 8:54 Rx

This would have been even quicker, had I not stopped to put my Vivoactive HR watch on to monitor!! Still, that took less than 5 secs so not exactly a game breaker 😀 😀 The temp here in Devon is peaking at about 28C which added to the spiciness of it all too. When I threw my scores on the the CF Watford Coaches WhatsApp group, I then found out that the head coach had increased the weights on-the-fly as she thought it would be too easy for people. Personally, I think it was absolutely bang on for my own requirements and I went for it. Thoroughly enjoyed it too!

Coming Up Next….. “Don’t let the shit get in the way of Your Time”

 

Bring a notebook, support your local coach

“1930 Night Ninjas, bring a notebook, it’s in your interests 😈”

If there was one behaviour I could change at the local CrossFit level,  it would be for the athletes to bring a notebook to class.

As coaches/trainers, most of us are a bit geeky about seeing positive change in our charges. We read articles on programming, movement, fitness, nutrition, et al, often late in to the night, even when we know we have a 6am session to prepare for. We’ll take a question from an athlete and go away to find the answer as soon as we can. We like being innovative in delivering classes, ensuring as many people get the benefits of time with a qualified trainer as possible. We’ll explain why the workout is the way it is, what the athlete will get out of it, why the programming is structured this way or that.

We do this because we genuinely care about athletes’ development. We want to see growth and change; it’s why we become trainers and coaches.

And so it is so incredibly frustrating when a strength portion of a WOD calls, rightly, for the class to work at a certain percentage of a 1RM and for the response to be, “I don’t know what my 1RM is” despite us having spent the previous cycle working up to one. Or to suggest scaling and for the question, “what should I scale it to?” despite you having just spent the warm up working up to the correct weight or rep scheme. My particular favourite – being blamed when an athlete has to change the weight half way through a WOD because, “you didn’t tell me what to scale it to so I rx’d it”.

You’re right, I didn’t tell you. I didn’t tell you because typically, we have classes of 11-16 people. We have a membership of about 100 people. As a coach, I could not possibly hold on to all of that information – if I could, I wouldn’t be a CrossFit trainer, I would be a maths professor working on the Mars lander programme. This is the responsibility of the athlete. Only you know what you got last time, how many reps you did, how fast you went, what your weakness was and what your strength was. Yes, as coaches we need to know our athletes, I fundamentally believe that, but I cannot know your 1RM Push Press or how fast you can do 50 Bar Facing Burpees.

Bring a notebook to class.

Not a phone.

A notebook.

I know it sounds patronising but consider the effort a coach has gone to in order to give the best they possibly can to a class of people driven by their own distinct, individual goals and motivations. We could turn up, turn on the lights, shout “3,2,1, GO!”, sit back and then clear up after (we do these things too, and more). Would that be worth your money when you can go to any generic branded gym and do that for a fraction of the price? It certainly wouldn’t be worth my time to get out of bed at 0515 every day if that was all I was going to give.

Please, bring a notebook. Make a note of the workout. A quick note of your top lifts in the session and jot down your time / reps for the WOD. Add a line on which bits you struggled on and where you excelled – that’s all there is to it.

Then, when the coach suggests you spend 5 mins before a WOD working your weaknesses, such as double unders, pull ups, handstands, whatever, you can look back and immediately identify where you are currently imbalanced in your fitness journey. When the board says, “Push Press 5 x 3 @ 85% 1RM”, you can quickly flick back through and know your numbers. When the MetCon has, “20 x Deadlifts @ 70kg”, you can look back and see that you managed 15 unbroken last time and so have a goal of 20 unbroken this time! We can’t possibly know all of this stuff about you, only you can.

So, help out your local coach. If they put the effort in to give you the best possible route to your goals, do your bit as well. Taking a photo doesn’t count, you can’t reference it quickly or write notes on it.

Get a notebook.

 

Here, I’ll even give you a link, because I’m a coach and I care: Mega Cheap Notebooks

Level 2 CrossFit Trainer now, don’t you know.

Some months ago I realised that my Level 1 Trainer qualification was about to expire, after 5 solid years of training others in 3 boxes (1 of them my own). I took some time to reevaluate whether or not CrossFit Coaching would have any part in my future before shelling out another $1000 on another course.

You see, for coaches there are negatives as well as the considerable positives of developing other people. Not only do we get in to the box that little earlier, set the place up (and tidy it, more often than not), and leave later, but for many of us it comes at the not inconsiderable sacrifice of our own training and fitness. That one spare hour in the day that many use to fit in their training, for us is that same hour that we coach others. It’s slightly different if you own a box but even then not too much. 

I’d identified this issue at CrossFit Keelhaul and then it transpired too in CrossFit Plymouth. Of course, it’s the same in CrossFit Watford. Despite this, I’ve made strong advances in my overall fitness attributes; I even set a new Clean personal best yesterday after 18+ months of trying. However, it was “only” 103.5kg, a solitary 1kg (2.2lb) improvement. Compared to others of my CF experience, I am well off of the mark by about 5-10kg. Still, it was an improvement and I’ll take it! I’m not sure that many athletes see the distinction between the coaches and the athletes, often perhaps thinking, “well you work here, you should be the fittest”. True, we should be among the fitter members but most often we won’t be at the top, especially if you travel from afar to coach- there simply isn’t the time to get both in. 

It could be argued that we could take part in the sessions. I’ve never been comfortable with this approach although, yes,  I have done it. Athletes pay to be coached. This isn’t Globogym (“we’re better than you!  And we know it!”) where you check in, get ignored by the ‘trainers’, do you your thing alone and leave. CrossFit is different. As coaches, we do care about our charges. While we want them all to be safe, more than that we want them to improve and soar, exceeding their own expectations, and smashing goals. We can’t ensure that if we take part too. At intensity, movement becomes shitty and patchy – we’re there to sort it out.

And it was the Coaching of others that swung it for me and prompted me to look at the Level 2 course.  Discussing it with Charlie & Hat, they offered to front up the cash and then I’d pay them back in coaching sessions. With military discount of $200, that brought the cost down immediately.  Another £180 of military funding, plus VAT rebate on it made it much more palatable and so it was last weekend that I found myself at CrossFit Perpetua in Battersea, London.

Immediately greeted by Bobbi, a belle from North Carolina, the long haired, big bearded Matt from south Wales and “I left the navy recently so am letting the hair hang out” McCoy from Scotland (and head coach at CrossFit Thames), we sat ourselves down and awaited the knowledge.


From the outset, it was pacey but very well structured. A much smaller gathering than the Level 1 Course,  there was an obvious focus on us from the coaches.  The aim of the course was to focus on coaching others in the 9 foundational movements, as well as group management. We held each other in front squats, overhead squats,  presses, etc, and analysed the positions to the nth degree before highlighting appropriate language and cues to develop the positions of others. We deep-dived in to programming methodology and had a no-holds-barred presentation on how CrossFit should be delivered as a programme, even if as affiliates we really are encouraged to build as we see fit. No questions were off limits and I took the opportunity to dig in to some nutrition information despite it not being on the programme.

We were assessed throughout,  encouraged, and given brutally honest feedback.  All 3 coaches were absolutely critical in their assessment and pulled no punches. It was exactly what I needed. After 5 years, you do become a bit soft, lazy and set in your ways. You need professionals to step in and break it up, give us fresh perspective and,  perhaps more importantly, reenergise and reenthuse. Enthusiasm was definitely their watchword. I don’t know if, as individuals, they are always like it but they held extremely high energy levels for the whole weekend.  We were treated to 2 workouts too, one MetCon and a heavy strength. Both were delivered in the manner of a ‘ideal’ lesson plan and I took considerable notes throughout.
The collection of coaches from the UK and the world who made up our 21 person contingent was immense. Australia, Denmark, Holland, Croatia, USA….all brought their incredible experiences to bear as we learned about and from each other. It is a testament to the genuine life-changing abilities of the CrossFit community that people are willing to travel so far and wide to learn and progress. I truly believe that many of us will stay in touch as our own journeys succeed onward and send upward.

We departed late on Sunday afternoon, a little battered and stretched, new certificate in hand, and definitely with a spring in our step. I feel as I did after the Level 1, ready to employ everything I’ve learned with the athletes, and with energy. 

Next up for me will likely be to get stuck in to the Anatomy Primer and to do a few of the online courses. 

In the meantime, it’s about the athletes.

I’m feeling motivated.

Coaching Goals, back to the Programme

“Who exactly seeks out a Coach? 

Winners”

– Chicago Tribune

What would you like to see from my blog this year?

How can I help you?

Answers in comments below.

 

Coaching Goals. Yesterday, I noted a few of my own health and fitness goals for 2017 and the reasons why. Before I get in to today’s blog proper, I should also note a few other goals related to yesterday’s but specifically for Coaching. To continue to grow as a generalist Coach, a CrossFit Coach and as a coach to the athletes of CF Watford, I will:

  • Revisit all of my Level 5 Diploma Coaching notes and papers.
  • Take on coaching opportunities with specific CF Watford Athletes.
  • Complete the CrossFit Level 2 Coaching course.
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It’s dark, it’s cold, it’s wet. It’s 6am. But I’m Batman.

Morning Session

And so it was, the alarm rudely interrupting me from a quite awesome dream of world domination, that I crept out of bed far more bleary-eyed than I would have liked. Late last night, I toyed with the idea of attending the CF Watford 0600 session but lazily decided against it in order to get back in to my Snatch Programme in-house. Tripping over my attempts to pull the compression socks on, I nudged the Tassimo in to life and smiled at the warming Americano smell, almost feeling the caffeine work its magic before it touched my lips. Blanketed from the cold morning north London air by my dad’s (too) large Ospreys hoody and my Ospreys hat, I trotted over to the gym, stopping only to Instagram my shiny new Batman mug (http://instagram.com/nomadiccrossfit) and post a few choice words.

Snatch Progression

Every Minute on the Minute, 20

3 x Snatch Hi-Pull

  • 5 Sets @ 50kg
  • 5 Sets @ 52.5kg
  • 5 Sets @ 55kg
  • 5 Sets @ 60kg

I thought I’d started at about the right level but didn’t progress up quick enough. I should have completed the final set of 5 x 3 with at least 65kg, perhaps more. I’ll address that next week. Still, it was good work all round and will be complemented nicely by the Overhead Squats that are coming up tonight.

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CrossFit Watford Evening Session

Strength

3 x 3 Overhead Squats

65 / 70 / 80kg

A New 3 RM! 77.5kg was my previous best. It might be 2.5kg but it’s an improvement. Am very happy with this! Strong and stable.

MetCon

Alternating EMOM 21

  1. 15 cal Row
  2. Max Effort Burpees
  3. 10 x Deadlifts at chosen weight

Score – Burpees: 15 / 15 / 12 / 12 / 10 / 10 / 13 = 87

I opted for 100kg initially for the Deadlifts. After 2 rounds, I realised this was foolish and then dropped it to 90kg. The burpees were the hardest part, if I’m honest. Going straight in to those after the rowing was evil 😉

 

Nutrition

  • Pre-Morning Session: 10g Walnuts (have run out of mixed nuts in my room!)
  • Post-Morning Session: 25g MyProtein Whey + 200ml Whole Milk
  • Breakfast: 50g Porridge Oats + 150ml Whole Milk
  • Mid-Morning Snack: 10g Mixed Nuts (final bag in the office)
  • Lunch: 3 x Scrambled Eggs + fresh spinach, home-grown chillis & mustard leaves, cherry tomatoes
  • Mid-Afternoon Snack: 10g Mixed Nuts
  • Dinner: Homemade Chilli (Zone portion) with twice as much cauliflower / broccoli
  • Post-WOD: 25g Whey Protein + Water
  • Snack: 3 thin slices Roast Beef

Goal Development Pt 3 – Tools

As we’ve progressed to this point, we have looked at what you think you want to achieve, how to identify what you actually want and how to look at motivational factors to help you achieve it.

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Today, we’re going to look at tools to really bring your goal in to focus and how to develop a pathway to achieving it. We’re going to begin formalising your goal by running through a confirmation checklist – The SMART Objective.

SMART Objectives

Specific.  The goal must be framed positively and very clearly. “I WILL” vs “I’m not going to….”. It must have the “why” attached. Ie; the reason you’ve picked this goal, your ultimate end state. You might have multiple mini – goals all moving you to a new place.

Measurable. The goal must be quantifiably measurable. It’s about the numbers, people.

Achievable. We’ll cover how you can assess how achievable your goal is in a moment with the GROW model. However, even at this stage you need to start breaking down your goal in to achievable, bite-sized chunks in your mind.

Realistic. Are you really swimming the English Channel in 6 months time, having never attempted an open water swim and not even been in the pool for 2 years?

Time-bound. There must be an end date. You are aiming towards something and the finish line must get closer with each passing moment.

“I WILL cycle from John O’Groats to Land’s End on Sept 30th in order to raise £5000 for charity.”

(I’m not actually doing that again, I’ve just picked a random example from my past)

 

SWOT Analysis

With the goal firmed up, we now need to look at a development pathway. You’re not suddenly going to cycle 901 miles (the route we took) in 3.5 months time if you’ve not been on a bike in years. Do you even have a bike? So we look at positives and negatives in your view that can help or hinder you.

Strengths.  What do you have in your arsenal that you can call on to achieve this goal? Perhaps you are naturally a determined person. Maybe, you always achieve your goals? You never let your mates down? You have always been fit? You might not have cycled in a while but you’ve been swimming a lot? Do you have a top of the range bike to get you over those Cornish hills (far worse than in Scotland). You know the route, having been on the support team for another team? Will a local business sponsor you? Draw on whatever you can that will directly transpose in to an asset for this task.

Weaknesses.  Be honest now.You need to consider weaknesses that will then be addressed later on when you set up your development pathway.  Are you a little less fit than you thought you were? Have you got a previous injury that will need to be looked at? Do you have a habit of starting tasks and then dropping out through lack of willpower? Do you have the confidence to request sponsorship?

Opportunities. Where Strengths and Weaknesses are INTERNAL to you, Opportunities and Threats are EXTERNAL factors. Do you have a free week coming up that you can exploit for extra training? Perhaps you know someone who lives on part of the route and you can get up there to train and orientate yourself to the ground? Does a friend have a great bike they’d willingly lend you?

Threats.  Maybe you’ve only got a few hours a week and can’t make all the proposed training rides.Do you even own a bike? Will your wife get upset with you being away (resulting in you having to put the time in before and after!). Is there a family birthday / anniversary coming up that you need to plan for?

GROW Model

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While SWOT is a great tool, we can now break the Goal down even further through use of the GROW model. Here, we will look at the goal, how far you are away from it (in achievement terms), all of the possible options available to you to succeeding and then finally what you actually have the will to do.

Goal.  Reiterate your SMART goal.

Reality. Taking your strengths and weaknesses from the SWOT analysis, how far away from being able to achieve the goal are you already? Do you already cycle long distances, albeit with a week or so rest in between? Perhaps riding a few miles is actually more than you can do at this stage (which we should have identified back up in the “Realistic” portion of the SMART objective – but I said we would revisit it and now is the chance).

Options.  At this point, we list every possible thing that you COULD do to achieve your goal. In the example of cycling 901 miles, you COULD :

  • a) Get up every morning at 6am for 30 mins on the bike
  • b) Drive the route over the next 4 weekends to familiarise yourself
  • c) Start taking on more food to make up for the excess calories you’re expending
  • d) Cycle to work every day
  • e) Spend the next 12 weekends cycling 25 miles per day, staying out over night to get used to the kit
  • f) Undertake a bicycle maintenance course
  • g) Cycle in your lunch break
  • h) Start a conditioning fitness class in the evenings
  • i) Hire a private coach to motivate you and ensure you meet your targets
  • j) Get online and find a cycling programme to build you up to the distance
  • The List Goes On and should be filled with everything from the sublime to the ridiculous. If it pops up in your head, put it on the list because you never know just what might be a possible option.

Will. Here, we are honest with ourselves once more. Here, you list those things you actually WILL do, either because of fixed restrictions in your life or because you simply don’t want to give up too much of your life in achieving this (and that is alright too, you know). So perhaps you decide that:

  • a) is just not happening because you work too late and need your sleep.
  • b) will happen because it’s a chance for a roadtrip with the family for them to see the country.
  • c) is a definite but you’re going to have to budget for it.
  • d) definitely – work is 10 miles away, so that’s 20 miles per day.
  • e ) no because you’re driving the route for 4 of them but after that you can reassess
  • f)………. you get the point.

 

So, by the end of this process, you have broken your goal down and thoroughly analysed whether or not it is realistic, what position you are in to achieve it and have begun to analyse factors in helping you get there.

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Development Programme

As a look forward, next week we will translate all this information in to a Development Schedule / Programme, populated with targets along the way; we will look at Branch Plans, just in case the unexpected gets in the way – we want you to remain motivated and not be put off just because of a bump in the road.

 

 

 

On Target at the end of the Week – 16 Jun 16

I’ll start with last night, Wed 15 Jun.

Pulling in to CF Watford, I was gunning for some barbell work; after a lot of bodyweight, aerobic, gymnastic work recently, I really wanted to get hold of the barbell and throw it around. The CF angels shone down and sure enough, I smiled at being welcomed by:

Strength – Snatch Accessory Work

4 x 3 Behind the Neck Snatch Grip Strict Press

20 x 20 / 5 x 40 / 3 x 45 / 3 x 47.5 / 3 x 50 / 3 x 52.5kg

The heaviest weight in the box, I am particularly pleased with this as I work towards getting back to beyond my previous Snatch best. All strict. I reckon I can go heavier too.

MetCon – Extended Anaerobic, Low Weight, Medium Reps

Here’s the fun part!

For Time (@42.5kg):

  • 20 x Thruster
  • 400m Run
  • 20 x Power Clean
  • 400m Run
  • 20 x Front Squats
  • 400m Run
  • 20 x Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press)
  • 400m Run
  • 20 x Overhead Squats

Time: 13:54 Rx

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Studying the board beforehand, I was a little intimidated by some 14.5min times on there. However, aim at them I did and SMASH!!!! Top score of the day! All Thrusters unbroken, Power Cleans SHOULD have been unbroken but I broke in to 10 / 5 / 5. Front Squats were 15 / 5 (could maybe have squeezed them all out), Push Press unbroken and Overhead Squats unbroken!!

I must confess to dancing around the gym as I came in under the 14 min mark. Boom!

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Cheers Arnold, you’re the best.

Today – 16 Jun 16

A whole day in a conference in central London and I was aching to get in to the gym tonight. However, after 3 days on the trot of muscular endurance work, I wanted to take another crack at my Clean & Jerks; 2 weeks ago I was upset to not get past 100kg Clean and only a 92.5kg Jerk (different sessions).

After conducting my #22kill #22pushupchallenge Day 10 video (here), I started pushing through some good Clean work.

Strength – Olympic Lifting

1 RM Clean & Jerk

80 / 80 / 85 / 85 / 90 / 95 / 90 / 92.5 / 97.5 / 100kg

YES! Back on track. Ok, it’s not my 102.5kg best but that’ll come. This was about getting confidence on the bar again and I’ve done that. It wasn’t plain sailing though; I failed at 95 and 102.5 while working up the ladder. I’d like to have had another 15 mins or so to go back down again and try to breach 100 but ultimately, I got what I wanted.

Nutrition

Not ideal. Conference food. It actually was very good quality but it was wraps, sauces, pastries, etc. I snacked on a few boiled eggs on the way home and ate homemade chilli & rice for dinner (thanks Mrs Nomad).

Well Being

A very poor night’s sleep last night. I’ve had a valerian sleep tea tonight and hope it does the trick. Once I’m asleep, all is well, it’s just getting there in the first place that seems to take time.

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